Our Story

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We want to put poverty in the past

We're starting with Asia and the Pacific, but we don't think poverty has a place anywhere. Let's end poverty, period.

Just over six years ago, seven friends, including 2010 Young New Zealander of the Year Dr Divya Dhar, decided to create a charity. Since then, we've grown to a nationwide movement, raised over $100,000 for development work, and engaged nearly 1,000 volunteers.

Umbrellas in Kalimpong

OUR VISION

To end extreme poverty well before 2030.

OUR MISSION

Together we build a movement of young New Zealanders with the passion, knowledge, and skills to take action against extreme poverty, starting with Asia and the Pacific.

World Changers Conference

OUR THEORY OF CHANGE

We have a volunteer-focused theory of change. That is, our theory of change starts with what our volunteers do, and ends with putting poverty in the past.

First, we activate young Kiwis, by connecting their heads, hearts and hands with the realities of extreme poverty. Then, we take action to help to end extreme poverty through fundraising, campaigning, and innovation.

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OUR VALUES

Our values connect our vision and our theory of change, and they underpin every single thing we do.

Like our theory of change, we make our values public, so everyone can help hold us up to them.


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Our team

OUR VOLUNTEERS

We only have one paid employee, so our volunteers are basically our everything. We have a team of university students and young professionals all over New Zealand, with a vast array of backgrounds - but a shared passion.

MEET THE TEAM

VOLUNTEER FOR P3

Here are a few of their stories:

Poverty Discriminates: The Social PreCOP

There are many reasons that people live in poverty. The one thing they all have in common is that no one chooses to be impoverished. Poverty discriminates. Some of the world's most poverty-stricken nations are in their predicament due to climate change.

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Founder’s story: ‘Flying on a bicycle’

During my medical elective, I embarked on a project to build houses for one of Costa Rica’s poorest regions. Having suffered through a severe flood, this region had no running water or electricity and most houses were constructed using corrugated iron and mud floors. I met a 9 year old girl whose family home we were rebuilding. She knew no English and I, no Spanish. So, from the moment we met, she sought to teach me Spanish. As our friendship grew, she took me on a bicycle ride, one that changed my life.

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